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Tonight! The Public Health Crisis of Detroit’s Mass Water Shutoffs

Tonight! The Public Health Crisis of Detroit’s Mass Water Shutoffs

Wednesday, July 26, 6 PM – 8 PM
Wayne State University Law School Spencer M. Partrich Auditorium
471 Palmer St W, Detroit, Michigan 48202

Long, Hot Summer Without Water: The Public Health Crisis of Detroit’s Mass Water Shutoffs

What happens when a city shuts off water to a resident’s house? What happens when a city shuts off water to tens of thousands of residents? This is what we are witnessing in Detroit: an ensuing public health catastrophe from water shutoffs in a city unwilling to address the needs of its people.

We invite you to join us in this community conversation with medical professionals and organizers coming together to call out the disastrous health impacts of Detroit’s mass water shutoffs.

This is event is free to attend and open to the public. FREE PARKING is available (tell attendant you’re here for this event):
– Lot 31 (in front of Law School)
– Structure 1 – Gate 3 (across from Law School)

WHAT WE WILL DISCUSS
In the 1960s, the notion of a long, hot summer became synonymous with discussions of the structural injustices underlying urban unrest. In the week we observe the 50th anniversary of the 1967 Rebellion, we gather to examine the public health impacts of living with massive water shutoffs. Fifty years later, we are facing a public health emergency of historic proportion.

Researchers have found a significant connection between Detroit’s water shutoffs and water-related illnesses, according to a recent study by researchers from Henry Ford Health System’s Global Health Initiative and Division of Infectious Disease in collaboration with We the People of Detroit.

The study showed:
1. Patients admitted to Henry Ford Hospital with water-related illnesses were significantly more likely to live on a block that has experienced water shutoffs. Patients diagnosed with skin and soft tissue diseases were 1.48 times more likely to live on a block that has experienced water shutoffs.

2. Living on a block that has experienced water shutoffs increases the likelihood that the patient will be diagnosed with a water-related illness.

3. Patients who are most likely to experience water-related illnesses resulting from water shutoffs are also the most socially vulnerable, according to the Center for Disease Control’s “Social Vulnerability Index.”