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Register Today! Detroit People’s Platform 2018 Summit

Register Today! Detroit People’s Platform 2018 Summit

 

Detroit People’s Platform 2018 Summit
Saturday, September 8, 2018 from 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM (EDT)
SEIU Local 1
2211 East Jefferson Avenue
Detroit, MI 48207
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Five years ago, in 2013, 250 Detroiters gathered at Marygrove College to create the Detroit People’s Platform. This year we will come together again for the Detroit People’s Platform’s 2018 Summit.

Majority-Black Detroit Matters

Please save the date and plan to join us on September 8th at SEIU Local 1 at 2211 East Jefferson Avenue from 9 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Lunch will be provided. The event is free, but registration is limited.

More details about the event will be shared soon.

 

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The QLine opened a year ago. We want our money back!

The QLine opened a year ago. We want our money back!


This weekend marks a year since the QLine’s grand opening. 

The total cost of the project was around $144 million, with almost $75 million coming from public funds. When the QLine opened on May 12th of 2017, Detroit Peoples Platform organized the WhyLine Action with over 100 people participating.

We gathered at multiple QLine stops and asked the important questions that no one else was asking.

Why does this development project use almost $75 million in public funds without a Community Benefit Agreement?

Why doesn’t the rest of the city have reliable public transit?

Why does the QLine exclude most Detroiters?

It’s been a year and now we’re not the only ones asking why.

More and more people recognize the injustice of using our public dollars without real public benefit. Based on an article in Bridge Magazine about the failure of the QLine to meet its numbers the press and media have become more critical of this example of transit gentrification.

One year in, Detroit’s QLine falling well short of expectations
https://www.bridgemi.com/detroit-journalism-cooperative/one-year-detroits-qline-falling-well-short-expectations

QLine has fewer riders than expected, report says
https://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/local/detroit-city/2018/05/02/qline-first-year-report-riders/34476031/

How Detroit’s Streetcar Overlooked Real Transit Needs to Satisfy a Well-Connected Few
https://usa.streetsblog.org/2018/03/14/how-detroits-streetcar-overlooked-real-transit-needs-to-satisfy-a-well-connected-few/

[bctt tweet=”With nearly $75 million in public funds spent on this proven failure Detroiters have every right to demand our money back! #Detroit #QLine #WhyLine #Transit” via=”no”]

 

Register today for our 2018 Summit!

Majority-Black Detroit Matters

Saturday, September 8, 2018
SEIU Local 1, 2211 East Jefferson Avenue

 

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Detroit: High Concentrated Poverty and High Corporate Tax Incentives

Detroit: High Concentrated Poverty and High Corporate Tax Incentives

The Free Press covered a damning new report on poverty in Detroit and across the US.  “Metro Detroit’s poverty gets worse despite city’s comeback”.

“A new look at the poorest urban areas in America, despite economic growth and increasing prosperity, puts metro Detroit near the top of the list. The report ranks the Detroit area at No. 5 in a list of impoverished communities.” Read More: https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/detroit/2018/04/26/detroit-poverty-getting-worse/553439002/

“A study by the Brookings Institution in 2016 found metro Detroit — which was defined in that report as a six-county region: including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Livingston, St. Clair, Lapeer — to have the highest rate of concentrated poverty among the most populous metro areas in America”. Read More: https://www.brookings.edu/research/u-s-concentrated-poverty-in-the-wake-of-the-great-recession/

[bctt tweet=”Our majority-black neighborhoods have the highest concentrated poverty of any large city in the US while millions in tax incentives have been given away to wealthy white developers Downtown. #Detroit” via=”no”]

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The QLine failure isn’t technical

The QLine failure isn’t technical

An article on the QLine’s low numbers by Chastity Pratt Dawsey from the Detroit Journalism Cooperative and Bridge Magazine sparked a great deal of discussion.

“After a year of constant problems, the shiny electric streetcar that hums down Detroit’s main thoroughfare has proven more troubled than trusty.

The QLine, the privately operated streetcar that launched along 3.3 miles of Woodward Avenue last May, attracted less than half of its projected riders for several months its first year, as it was beset by traffic snarls and dwindling popularity.

The train that reaches top speeds of 30 mph averaged more than five stoppages a week, a total of 267, and was frequently operating behind schedule due to parked cars on its tracks and traffic jams near the Little Caesars Arena. 

Records obtained by Bridge Magazine show the streetcar fell well short of expectations of 5,000 to 8,000 riders per day.” Read More

[bctt tweet=”The failure of the QLine isn’t technical. Most Detroiters didn’t want it in the first place and don’t use it. #Detroit ” via=”no”]

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Update: Rental Regulation Ordinance

Update: Rental Regulation Ordinance

In October of 2017, Detroit City Council voted unanimously on an ordinance to toughen rental regulations. The ordinance could greatly impact many renters and increase displacement. The city is implementing the ordinance through the neighborhoods by zip code. They  started with 48215 on the East Side February 1st. 

Downtown, Midtown and New Center are changing rapidly. While many have called for equal investment and treatment in our neighborhoods, as the city’s develops policy to focus on  neighborhoods are they doing enough to protect those who are already living there? 

[bctt tweet=”In order to shift investment into more that just greater downtown and historic neighborhoods of affluence, areas of the city have been and are being “cleaned up” so that they are more appealing to investors and new settlers. #Detroit ” via=”no”]

The policies being developed are double-edged. The RRO process will successfully bring rentals up to code, but at what cost? The ordinance is written in such a way that it’s success could reduce already hard to find low income housing. 

Download the full pdf