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Jefferson Chalmers Community Advocates demand Development without Displacement

Jefferson Chalmers Community Advocates demand Development without Displacement

#DevelopmentWithoutDisplacement

Detroit – Today the Jefferson Chalmers Community Advocates visited Detroit City Council to present signatures from over 300 households from their ongoing “Development without Displacement” campaign. The petition is in support of 12 demands that have been put together based on citizen led organizing and surveying.

In December 2017, a group of long time residents in the Jefferson Chalmers neighborhood came together to discuss the plans the city is making for redevelopment in their neighborhood. Jefferson Chalmers Community Advocates began to engage residents in face to face conversations about community needs while at the same time collecting important survey data.

The group has been focused on responding to the Strategic Framework Plan that the city is currently hosting community engagement meetings on. They have also met with their Council representative, Council Member André L. Spivey. Due to lack of adequate response the city Jefferson Chalmers Community Advocates have prepared, collected and are now presenting these petitions.

Petition by the People of Jefferson Chalmers

We, the undersigned residents acknowledge that the Declaration of Rights included in the Charter of the City of Detroit states “The people have a right to expect city government to provide for its residents, decent housing; job opportunities; reliable, convenient and comfortable transportation; recreational facilities and activities; cultural enrichment, including libraries and art and historical museums; clean air and waterways, safe drinking water and a sanitary, environmentally sound city.” Therefore, as residents we demand a more equitable and inclusive planning and economic development process that prioritizes the voice and recommendations of our residents and honors the community’s historical and current priorities as cited:

  • Provide home repair grants for fixed low-income residents (owner occupied) who have been residing in the home for 1 year or more.
  • Retain property tax levels at current rates for the life of the homeowner and any surviving heirs who remain in the home.
  • Ensure that only homes that cannot be rehabbed will be demolished after assessment is made by a third party not affiliated with the Land Bank.
  • Assure that once a home has been demolished a comparable home is built in its place within a 12-24 month period.
  • Community Residents will be given first priority to purchase Land Bank owned property.
  • Offer incentives to reopen a mixed-use community center, specifically Maheras-Gentry.
  • All waterfront parks will remain public.
  • Make sure there are separate buildings for elementary and middle schools for students in the Jeff Chalmers area.
  • The city office of General Services will create jobs for community residents to perform park maintenance and park patrols.
  • Upon the recommendation of an independent party demolish all Land Bank/city-owned buildings along the Jefferson Corridor that cannot be rehabbed. Offer incentives to have the demolished buildings replaced with businesses needed in the community as noted in the community survey.
  • Create an enterprise zone within the Jefferson Chalmers Community and a  Workforce Development Office.
  • Remove bike lanes from main thoroughfares, i.e. Jefferson Avenue.
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City Charter Revision Commission Candidate Night

City Charter Revision Commission Candidate Night

In the August Primary Detroiters voted on whether or not to “open” and revise the City Charter. The City Charter can be likened to the U.S. or Michigan Constitution. Proposal R was successful by only a slight margin of 184 votes. Since it passed, Charter Revision Commission Candidates will be on the ballot in November. There will be 16 candidates on the ballot for this 9 seat commission. Learning as much a possible about these candidates before the election is important because they will shape the 3 year revision process. Vote Tuesday, Nov 6, 2018!

All Charter Revision Candidates were invited to attend.
We were joined by 7 candidates:
Chase Cantrell, Cindy Darrah (write-in),  Karissa Holmes,  Denzel  McCampbell,  Tracy Peters,  Nicole Small, and Joanna Underwood.

The Detroit People’s Platform does not endorse candidates.

Please note that the video was captured from the live stream of the event and is not production-quality. Drops in the signal are noted.
The video is intended for election education purposes only and is part of DPP public education work.

 

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Homes for All! Support the Housing Trust Fund

Homes for All! Support the Housing Trust Fund

Detroit is enjoying national attention for its revitalization efforts, but not everyone is benefitting equally. Corporations and investors from around the world have shifted enormous amounts of investment into Detroit.

Detroit is experiencing an explosion of investment. Investors are purchasing land and buildings from the City, the City is investing money in infrastructure improvements in selected neighborhoods, and developers are investing money in rehabilitating buildings for trendy new restaurants, luxurious apartments, hotels, condos, and upscale boutiques. The revitalization of Detroit’s housing market includes building and renovating mostly market-rate housing that the average long-time Detroiter can’t afford to live in.

However, the one thing that Detroit has not been willing to invest in is permanently affordable housing for current residents to continue living in their neighborhoods as housing costs begin rise. 

Right now, the average Detroiter spends 60% of their monthly income on housing. This is one of the highest rental burdens in the country. One in five Detroit renters face eviction every year. That makes Detroit one of the top 10 cities for annual evictions. In order to reverse these trends that threaten to displace long-term Detroiters the City must commit to protecting and creating quality permanent affordable homes and apartments for the Detroit families who need them most.

The Mayor of Detroit has created many talking points about affordable housing. These include statements such as: “We will not support development that moves Detroiters out so others can move in” and “Every area of Detroit will have a place for people of all incomes.”

To honor these commitments the City of Detroit must take action by creating and funding a housing plan for constructing and protecting a substantial amount of high-quality affordable homes for the Detroit families who need them most. This must be done simultaneously with the city’s redevelopment efforts. This is the only way to reduce the threat of displacement.

For these reasons, Detroit People’s Platform is joining with allies across the country to launch the Homes for All Campaign here in Detroit to demand the following:

• Commitment to fund the creation and protection of permanent and deeply affordable housing 

• Increased renter protections

• Sufficient revenue stream to support the Housing Trust Fund

Detroit People’s Platform will be meeting with residents and renters across the city to make sure our voices are heard around this critical policy issue. 

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Fare Justice Not Fare Increases

Fare Justice Not Fare Increases

DDOT Undergoes Major Changes in September: Restored Access to Woodward in downtown Detroit and Proposed Fare Increases

Keep Woodward on Woodward Campaign a success! 

On September 5th, the Detroit Department of Transportation (DDOT) restored the Woodward #53 now referred to as #4 to its direct route on Woodward Ave all the way through downtown Detroit. The Detroit People’s Platform Transit Justice Team organized the “Keep Woodward on Woodward” campaign collecting signatures from DDOT bus riders 

The campaign demanded the restoration of the Woodward bus through downtown Detroit. This is a major win for residents, restaurant workers, security guards, custodians, and others who work, shop, and access social and government services in downtown Detroit.

We thank the petition signers for their support and the volunteers of the Transit Justice Team for making this win possible!

Fare Justice Not Fare Increases

In early September, DDOT proposed a new fare structure. This proposed fare restructuring will increase the base fare by 33% from $1.50 to $2.00 and will increase the prices of bus passes compared to the current system. The new fare structure will eliminate transfers and replace it with a 4-hour pass for access to any DDOT and SMART bus. It also eliminates the $0.50 fee when a DDOT bus rider transfers to the SMART bus system. Most importantly, all passes under this new proposed fare structure will be rolling passes which can be bought at any time and are only valid once activated. For example, if one purchases a 7-day pass on Tuesday and uses it that day, it will expire 7 days from Tuesday. 

Bus riders still cannot count on DDOT bus service for on-time and reliable access to work, school, medical appointments and worship. In Detroit, families and individuals are facing high rents, losing their homes to tax foreclosures, and experiencing water-shutoffs across the city at an alarming rate.

This is not the time to raise bus fares.  

Detroit Peoples Platform Calls for DDOT bus riders to take the following actions:  

• Call your city councilmember and demand that council vote down the proposed bus fare increases. Urge council to adopt a low-income fare policy instead. This low income fare policy would allow low-income Detroit residents to pay the same reduced fares that seniors, students, and persons with disabilities currently pay. 
• Attend city council meetings and offer public comment. Plan to arrive by 9:30am on Mondays and Tuesdays on the 13th floor of the Coleman A. Young Municipal Center at 2 Woodward Ave. DPP urges bus riders to leave comments with DDOT regarding the proposed fare increase.  

Detroit City Council main line: (313) 224-3443
Detroit Department of Transportation: (313) 933-1300 or email at: ddotcomment@detroitmi.gov

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Dear Ford, If you want to create tomorrow together, let’s get real today with a legitimate CBA.

Dear Ford, If you want to create tomorrow together, let’s get real today with a legitimate CBA.

October 14, 2018
Detroit – The Equitable Detroit Coalition has released an open letter to Ford Motor Co. This letter challenges Ford to go further and agree to a CBA worthy of a $17 billion multinational corporation.

Ford Motor Co. has a net worth of nearly $17 billion. They want $239 million in tax breaks for their $740 million project in Corktown. They want to “fast track” an abatement of $104 million in city taxes over 35 years to catch another $18.7 million in tax breaks from the state by the end of October.

CALL TO ACTION:

Monday – Call Council

On Monday, October 15th, we are asking Detroit People’s Platform members and supporters to call their District Council Member and their ‘at large’ Council Members, Council President Brenda Jones and Council Member Janee Ayers. 

Tuesday – Attend Council Meeting and make Public Comment

On Tuesday, October 16th, Detroit City Council will vote on the Community Benefits Agreement for the Ford Corktown project. The meeting will begin at 10am. We advise people to arrive early to locate parking, get a seat and a public comment card.

Share the “Dear Ford” video

Please use #DearFord to share on social media.

Share the “Dear Ford” letter

Dear Ford Motor Co.,

We are the Equitable Detroit Coalition (EDC) the city-wide Community Benefit Agreement (CBA) coalition representing a constituency of nearly 100,000 Detroiters who voted “YES” on Proposal A. Proposal A mandated strong and legally binding Community Benefit Agreements on large projects that receive public subsidy.

To begin, we acknowledge the hard work of community members and the Neighborhood Advisory Council (NAC) with the Ford Motor Company’s Corktown Project. We also recognize the pressure on the NAC and the community to cooperate and not offend Ford given the unique role the corporation has played in Detroit and Southeast Michigan for the previous 100 years. Yet, we would be remiss not to lift up the fact that the fortunes of Ford Motor Company and the intergenerational wealth of the Ford family were, in part. built on the backs of labor and Detroit workers.

The tensions that many Detroiters hold regarding corporate incentives is well known and documented. In a perfect world these incentives would not exist. Sadly, the political reality is that you, Ford Motor Company, will prevail in your request for $240 million dollars in public tax subsidies successfully diverting millions of dollars from much needed community improvements for decades to come. The community asked for up to $75 million in funds to support a broad array of community benefits including affordable housing for the most vulnerable, neighborhood and infrastructure improvements, workforce training, scholarships and other benefits. Your response was to offer a package of $10 million. This doesn’t go far enough.

Further, we want to remind you that while Ford is preparing for a successful future, many residents live in present day Detroit, where real people are being negatively impacted as part of the changes this and other private economic development projects bring with them. Less than a mile away from your project there are households where families with children exist without water, are threatened with housing displacement, and possibly face forced removal from their community. The median income around the project area is only $23,160.

On behalf of our constituent base, we urge Ford representatives to return to the table and renegotiate a real and legally-binding CBA with community. We challenge Ford Motor Co. to go further and agree to a CBA that is worthy of a $17 billion, multinational corporation. If Ford wants to create tomorrow together, let’s get real today with a legitimate CBA.

Sincerely,
The Equitable Detroit Coalition

Download the letterDearFord

 

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Charter Revision Candidate Night – Thursday, October 25 6 pm – 7:30 pm

Charter Revision Candidate Night – Thursday, October 25 6 pm – 7:30 pm

Election 2018 – Vote November 6th

CHARTER REVISION COMMISSION CANDIDATE NIGHT

In the August Primary Detroiters voted on whether or not to “open” and revise the City Charter. The City Charter can be likened to the U.S. or Michigan Constitution. Proposal R was successful by only a slight margin of 184 votes. Since it passed, Charter Revision Commission Candidates will be on the ballot in November. There will be 16 candidates on the ballot for this 9 seat commission.

Learning as much a possible about these candidates before the election is important because they will shape the 3 year revision process. 

Thursday, October 25
6:00 pm – 7:30 pm – FREE! 

Wellness Plan Building
First Floor Cafeteria
7700 Second Ave @ Pallister
Detroit, 48202

A light dinner will be served at 6:00 and the forum will start at 6:30 pm.

Charter Revision Commission Candidate Night Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/737546463257396/

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Meet the Judges Night – Wed, October 17 5:30 – 7:00 pm

Meet the Judges Night – Wed, October 17 5:30 – 7:00 pm


 

 

 

Election 2018 – Vote November 6th

Meet the Judges Night

The 36th District Court Judges have a great deal of power and their decisions impact our communities and our livelihoods. There will be 10 seats on your ballot in the general election on November 6th.  We will be specifically asking questions around landlord/tenant court.

Wednesday, October 17
5:30 – 7:00 pm – FREE! 

Wellness Plan Building
First Floor Cafeteria
7700 Second Ave @ Pallister
Detroit, 48202

A light dinner will be served at 5:30 and the forum will start at 6:00 pm.

Facebook for Meet the Judges: https://www.facebook.com/events/923120514554257/