Category Archives

37 Articles

Posted on

Detroit ’67, Remembering the Rebellion – “The police were the riot, the people were rebelling.” George Gaines

Detroit ’67, Remembering the Rebellion – “The police were the riot, the people were rebelling.” George Gaines

RTRGeorgeGaines

Detroit ’67, Remembering the Rebellion – “The police were the riot, the people were rebelling.” George Gaines

1967 – “The police were the riot, the people were rebelling against a long tortured history of racial segregation in our neighborhoods, against Mayor Cavanagh, who we helped elect, because he didn’t address housing and police violence; and against de-industrialization as manufacturing plants moved to the suburbs without the transit needed for Detroiters to get to jobs. Those were the undercurrents.”

2017 – “Now we have massive water shut offs. In addition to the foreclosure crisis and the impact of emergency management and bankruptcy, the undercurrents in 2017 include hostility within the black community over water shut offs and the inequity in water rates between the city and suburbs with a 40% rate increase in Detroit over 4 years. These are some of the undercurrents not being addressed today.“

by George Gaines
Lifelong Detroiter, Former Deputy Director, Detroit Health Department, Founding Member of the Detroit People’s Platform Action Council.

#Remember67
#DetroitPeoples

Remembering the Rebellion – “The police were the riot, the people were rebelling.” George Gaines

Posted on

2017 EJAM Fellowship Application

2017 EJAM Fellowship Application

ejam-logosm

2017 EJAM Fellowship Application

This intensive training is designed for individuals who are interested in making an impact in their community through organizing around economic justice issues, including: raising wages and increasing benefits for workers. This fellowship provides the opportunity to gain valuable community organizing skills and experience working with social justice organizations in metro-Detroit. This on-the-ground experience not only helps you make change within your community, but also, can help you gain meaningful and higher-paying employment in the future. Application Deadline: Nov 25, 2016

2017 Fellowship Application

Posted on

People’s Platform Transit News – November 2016

People’s Platform Transit News – November 2016

rtaelectionresults2016

Suburban opposition to the RTA

During a vote to adopt the Regional Master Transit Plan, the RTA’s 20 year vision for regional transit, representatives from Macomb and Oakland county, that sit on the RTA Board of Directors, voted against the plan. They did this to increase decision-making power for their counties over funding DDOT/SMART and changes to the plan. They advocated for the creation of a “Financial Allocation Committee” which would pull 1 member from the Board of Directors from each county and Detroit’s sole representative. This 5-member body would have say over transit funding split for DDOT and SMART and would make the final decision to changes in routes or other aspects of the Regional Master Transit Plan. The catch is that they would have to vote unanimously on any decision that is presented to this committee, and with Detroit only having 1 representative, this further shifts power to suburbanites, to make decisions that will affect the majority of bus riders that reside in Detroit.

Reasons we remained neutral on the RTA

● Detroiters, especially bus riders, did not have a sufficient voice in the planning process.
● Governance: Detroit only has one representative on the board, we don’t have control over the DDOT/SMART funding split. (Very little say in governance and lack of financial control)
● Based on the changes to the Regional Master Transit Plan, the creation of the “Financial Allocation Committee” gave us enough concern about the lack of control and inadequate representation.
● Concern that the RTA wants to act as a competing service provider instead of a transit coordinating authority. Though DDOT would continue to exist as it’s own entity, many Detroiters we’ve spoken to, expressed concern about the elimination of the department and routes that Detroiters use for their daily commute.
● Concern that Detroit’s share of taxes raised through the millage would support the QLine (M1-Rail) in 2027 and after.

What are the next steps from the Transit Justice Team?

If the RTA’s Regional Master Transit Plan is up for reconsideration, we will advocate that any plan must include Detroiters having a greater say. That means the RTA must offer more opportunities for Detroiters to provide input and foster participation in the planning process. Most importantly, the RTA must make an effort to include improving DDOT service as a main priority, and we seek the elimination of the financial allocation committee – which takes funding power away from Detroit and leave it to the mercy of suburbanite decision-makers.

The lack of adequate public transit in Detroit is a civil rights issue that has been ongoing for far too long. We will continue to organize bus riders around achieving transit justice, to ensure not only Detroiters have a greater say in the Regional Master Transit Plan, but that DDOT must continue to expand and improve service for ALL bus riders in the city, especially for individuals with disabilities and the elderly.

We will advocate to build more bus shelters, and upgrade facilities that service bus riders, and to continue to increase frequency, reduce commute times, and to provide better customer service for passengers. With winter on the way, NO bus rider in Detroit should have to endure long waits and long commute times. Transit justice is ensuring that Detroiters can access the vital institutions and be able to move freely around the city and the region.

“All neighborhoods deserve access and quality public transit!”
Join our Movement for Transit Justice!
transit@detroitpeoplesplatform.org
313.398.9396

People’s Platform Transit news – November 2016 – More: detroitpeoplesplatform.org

Posted on

The RTA, Transit Justice and Racial Equity w/sample ballot

The RTA, Transit Justice and Racial Equity w/sample ballot

rtaheader

What is the Regional Master Transit Plan?

In 2012, the Michigan Legislature, with the governor’s approval, created the Regional Transit Authority of Southeast Michigan (RTA). It’s mission is to serve as a public transit authority that will “sit on top of” the existing public transit providers: Detroit Department of Transportation, “DDOT,” The Detroit Transportation Corporation, “The People Mover,” and the Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transportation, “SMART.”

The Regional Master Transit Plan will span from 2016 to 2036, a 20-year plan, that will create a new paratransit service for individuals with disabilities and the elderly, create new bus lines called Cross-County-Connectors, Airport Express, Bus Rapid Transit (BRT), Detroit-to-Ann Arbor Commuter Rail, coordinate schedules between DDOT and SMART, and it will introduce a universal fare card for use on all bus lines.

rtatimeline

 

rtaquestions

Representation vs. Ridership
Detroit passengers of the DDOT system represent the majority of bus riders in the city and overall region.
Governance in the RTA is tipped towards the suburban counties, and they have far more power to make decisions on funding for the DDOT and SMART and major changes to the Regional Master Transit Plan. We have to ask ourselves, is one vote on the RTA executive board worth ours this November 8th?

Transit Justice – does this plan achieve that?
How will bus service improve for the majority of Detroiters that do not live on the main corridors? Why does the Regional Master Transit Plan emphasize better service for commuters to travel to job centers inside and out of Detroit, yet make no mention for improved service in the neighborhoods?
Will DDOT feeder bus lines (like Crosstown, Plymouth, Van Dyke) be improved or do you have to live on a main street for better transit service?
Does the Regional Master Transit Plan improve service for the majority of Detroiters on routes where waits of up to or more than an hour is common?

Unknowns
We do not know how much or if fares will rise in the near term after the ballot proposal vote for the RTA.
How much will the RTA bus lines like the Bus Rapid Transit (BRT), Cross-County-Connectors, and Airport Express cost? Will it be affordable for the average bus rider in Detroit?

Future of DDOT
Does DDOT stand to risk reducing or eliminating bus lines that will exist on Grand River, where a Cross-County-Connector line will be introduced, or on Gratiot, where a Bus Rapid Transit line will eventually be built?
How will bus service improve for Detroiters that use, for example, Joy Rd/Tireman, Mack, Schoolcraft, and Vernor – routes that aren’t seeing improvements in frequency and short wait times?

Q-Line as an example of transit gentrification
The M1-Rail, now known as the Q-Line, is a prime example of private and federal tax money being used for private gain. The primary benefit of the 3.3 mile streetcar line is for economic development in downtown Detroit, Midtown, and New Center area, as it excludes the North End community and other neighborhoods north of the Boulevard.
When the RTA assumes control of Q-Line in 2027, will our tax money be used to financially support a limited streetcar line that excludes Detroiters north of the ‘Boulevard?”

On  November 8th, Detroiters will vote on a ballot proposal to fund the Regional Transit Authority of Southeast Michigan (RTA). All registered voters in Detroit will be asked to vote either: yes or no to financially support the RTA.

rtasampleballot

Posted on

Detroit WITHOUT REAL Community Benefits – Loss of Economic Opportunity

Detroit WITHOUT REAL Community Benefits – Loss of Economic Opportunity

What Detroit looks like WITHOUT REAL Community Benefit Agreements:
Loss of Economic Opportunity

The North End and the M-1 Light Rail/Q-Line

Public Funds for transportation used for private real estate development. Proposal A, the People’s Community Benefits Ordinance came out of the struggle for benefits around the M1 Light Rail.

This is just one of the many reasons why we need REAL Community Benefit Agreements. Vote YES on A and NO on B! Vote on Both for your vote to count! In order for the People’s CBO to become adopted Proposal A must win and Proposal B must be defeated.

#YESonA #NOonB #Detroit
#RiseTogetherDetroit #DetroitPeoples

Learn More – Volunteer – Donate
http://risetogetherdetroit.com/

Taken from the Detroit People’s Platform NEWS, #9, September 2016
http://detroitpeoplesplatform.org/

Posted on

Transit Alert! Join us on Social Media this morning! #RTAMasterPlan

Transit Action Alert!

Join us on Social Media this morning!

Today the Regional Transit Authority of Southeast Michigan (RTA) will finally release the long-anticipated Regional Master Transit Plan.

Read more about the plan here

The plan will affect and change our public transit system for the next 20 years. The plan’s release will not take place in Detroit, where a majority of bus riders use the system on a daily basis. Detroit bus riders will be greatly impacted by the plan. Instead, the event will take place at Lawrence Technological University on May 3st, 10am.

Lawrence Technological University
21000 West Ten Mile Rd., 48075, Southfield, MI
The meeting will be held in the University Gallery, Room. 210

This meeting is being held on a weekday morning and Lawrence Tech isn’t in a transit friendly so we want to get the word out this morning!

A group of Detroit People’s Platform Transit Leaders and Bus Riders are going to the meeting and will be tweeting live to bus riders across Detroit.

Bus riders in the city of Detroit need to be aware that this event is taking place. Detroiters need to be a part of this meeting in order to respond to the proposals being made in the Master Plan. It is crucial that Detroiters are aware of what services will be offered to us over the next 20 years.

Questions we’re asking
“Is this the system designed with our needs in mind as bus riders?”
“Will we be able to rely on proposed routes and services in years to come?”
“Will this plan be worth our vote?”

Join the Discussion by using these hashtags
#DetroitPeoples #RTAMasterPlan #DetroitTransit

Follow and make comments to the RTA on Social Media
@RTAmichigan
https://www.facebook.com/rtamichigan

TransitNewsletterTimeline

Posted on

DDOT Crosstown Bus (#14) Survey

Thank you for your interest in taking our survey regarding the conditions bus riders face on the Detroit Department of Transportation (DDOT) Crosstown #14 bus route. These responses assess service-related issues that bus riders face when riding the Crosstown #14 bus.

The Detroit People’s Platform Transit Justice Team is circulating this survey for the purpose of raising the priority of the Crosstown bus route for needed improvements.  We believe it is important to focus on routes that service bus riders within the city of Detroit for improvements.

I’ve invited you to fill out the form DDOT (Detroit Department of Transportation) Crosstown Bus (#14) Survey. To fill it out, visit:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1hMHqqHloiCqCbEExTlNQeiwgpUKNTx_giqReWBl1Fd0/viewform?c=0&w=1&usp=mail_form_link

Posted on

People’s Platform Transit Update – 24-Hour Service on Grand River, Woodward and Gratiot

TRANSITNew Proposed DDOT Schedule

The DDOT new proposed schedule took effect on January 23, 2016 with 24-hour service brought back on three major routes. We at the Detroit People’s Platform hope this is only the beginning of ongoing improvements based on customer needs as the demand for public transit increases. The following list details what riders can expect with the new changes:

24-hour service

#21 Grand River – All Days, introduce 24-hour service
#34 Gratiot – All Days, change route to travel between Downtown and Gratiot & 8 Mile. Service to Eastland Center available to use 17 Eight Mile. All Days Introduce 24-hour service.
#53 Woodward – All Days, introduce 24-hour service. Sundays, improve daytime service to every 15 minutes.

Full list of changes

#16 Dexter – Add trips on Weekday Mornings.
#17 Eight Mile –  All Days, extend route form 8 mile & Gratiot to Mack & Moross [featuring earlier morning service] later night service and adjusted times for better reliability.
#18 Fenkell – Saturdays, change daytime service to every 50 minutes. Extend night service one hour later.
#19 Fort – All Days, return to regular routing over Rouge River drawbridge. Introduce new schedules with adjusted service levels: Weekdays every 27-35 minutes, Saturdays every 40 minutes, Sundays every 60-65 minutes.
#21 Grand River – All Days, introduce 24-hour service
#23 Hamilton – To Improve reliability, introduce new schedules: Weekdays every 30-50 minutes, Saturdays every 60 minutes. Adjustments to night departure times from Rosa Parks Transit Center.
#25 Jefferson – To improve reliability, introduce new schedules with improved service: Weekdays every 15-20 minutes, Saturdays every 25-45 minutes. Adjustments to night departure times from Rosa Parks Transit Center.
#27 Joy Road – To Improve reliability, introduce new schedules with adjusted service levels: Weekdays every 30-50 minutes, Saturdays every 60 minutes, Sundays every 60 minutes. Adjustments to night departure times from Rosa Parks Transit Center.
#29 Linwood – All Days, minor schedule adjustments.
#31 Mack – All Days, change rout to travel between Rosa Parks Transit Center and Mack & Moross (St. John Hospital). Service to Moross, Kelly and Eastland Center available to transfer over to the 17 – Eight Mile. New schedule to match new routing.
#32 McNichols – Saturdays and Sundays, change western start/end point from Rockdale to Meijer/Old Redford. all Days, introduce new schedules to improve reliability. Enhanced travel options
#34 Gratiot – All Days, change route to travel between Downtown and Gratiot & 8 Mile. Service to Eastland Center available to use 17 Eight Mile. All Days Introduce 24-hour service.
#41 Schaefer – Introduce new schedules: Weekdays every 60 minutes, Saturdays every 60 minutes, Sundays every 60 minutes.
#45 Seven Mile – All Days, start and end point from Grand River & Redford to Meijer/Old Redford. All Days, new schedules matching new routing.
#53 Woodward – All Days, introduce 24-hour service. Sundays, improve daytime service to every 15 minutes.

Lastly, here is a new feature:

>>> Transferless Transfer <<<
On certain routes, designated trips continue service on another route. For example, some buses arriving at Rosa Parks Transit Center as Route 23 Hamilton depart as Route 29 Linwood. Customers transferring from Route 23 to Route 29 can remain on the bus without buying or using a transfer. Please consult individual schedules to see which routes and trips are proposed for this convenient new feature!

transitreportRead the State of Detroit Transit report for more information on the work of the Detroit People’s Platform Transit Team.

 

 

 

Posted on

The State of Transit in Detroit

 

transitreport
The Detroit People’s Platform have been working on transit justice issues for 5 years with our partner, the North End Woodward Community Coalition.

– Our work was focused primarily on DDOT (Detroit Dept. of Transportation).

– 2012 service cuts and the re-envisioning of the M1-project from a commuter rail line, scaled down to a 3.3-mile streetcar that only serves the downtown and midtown areas, while leaving out neighborhoods like the North End without adequate transit options.

– We recognize that Detroiters face transit injustice, especially with the 2012 service cuts that eliminated 24-hour service, cut late night bus service, routes, layoff of drivers, and transfer of 40 DDOT coaches to SMART, causing delays from 1-3hours on routes that were previously reliable.

– Two transit systems now exist in Detroit: If you live south of the ‘Boulevard, the options for transit are plenty: SMART and eventually the M1-streetcar, and the soon to be proposed Bus Rapid Transit line for Woodward, in addition to private shuttle services provided by downtown employers.

– However, the rest of Detroiters, especially north of the ‘Boulevard face an inadequate bus system, waiting hours just to traverse within the city. While new systems are being developed to shuttle people in and out the city at a faster place than a working individual trying to maintain a job in the city, having to spend more of their time waiting, in other words — no one should have to give themselves 3 hours just to make it to their job on time.

Download the full State of Transit in Detroit!