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Detroit People’s Platform print copies of the People’s Platform News 3 times a year.
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Vote No on Proposal R

Vote No on Proposal R

On Tuesday, August 7 2018 there will be one proposal on your primary ballot. Proposal R asks Detroiters if they favor a “general revision” of the City Charter. If opened, the Charter could be changed in many ways. Proposal R, if passed, could; restrict community power and oversight, reduce government accountability and ruin our chances to fully restore democracy in Detroit.

Detroit People’s Platform encourages our members, supporters and all Detroiters to Vote NO on Proposal R!

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2017 EJAM Fellowship Application

2017 EJAM Fellowship Application

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2017 EJAM Fellowship Application

This intensive training is designed for individuals who are interested in making an impact in their community through organizing around economic justice issues, including: raising wages and increasing benefits for workers. This fellowship provides the opportunity to gain valuable community organizing skills and experience working with social justice organizations in metro-Detroit. This on-the-ground experience not only helps you make change within your community, but also, can help you gain meaningful and higher-paying employment in the future. Application Deadline: Nov 25, 2016

2017 Fellowship Application

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People’s Platform Transit News – November 2016

People’s Platform Transit News – November 2016

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Suburban opposition to the RTA

During a vote to adopt the Regional Master Transit Plan, the RTA’s 20 year vision for regional transit, representatives from Macomb and Oakland county, that sit on the RTA Board of Directors, voted against the plan. They did this to increase decision-making power for their counties over funding DDOT/SMART and changes to the plan. They advocated for the creation of a “Financial Allocation Committee” which would pull 1 member from the Board of Directors from each county and Detroit’s sole representative. This 5-member body would have say over transit funding split for DDOT and SMART and would make the final decision to changes in routes or other aspects of the Regional Master Transit Plan. The catch is that they would have to vote unanimously on any decision that is presented to this committee, and with Detroit only having 1 representative, this further shifts power to suburbanites, to make decisions that will affect the majority of bus riders that reside in Detroit.

Reasons we remained neutral on the RTA

● Detroiters, especially bus riders, did not have a sufficient voice in the planning process.
● Governance: Detroit only has one representative on the board, we don’t have control over the DDOT/SMART funding split. (Very little say in governance and lack of financial control)
● Based on the changes to the Regional Master Transit Plan, the creation of the “Financial Allocation Committee” gave us enough concern about the lack of control and inadequate representation.
● Concern that the RTA wants to act as a competing service provider instead of a transit coordinating authority. Though DDOT would continue to exist as it’s own entity, many Detroiters we’ve spoken to, expressed concern about the elimination of the department and routes that Detroiters use for their daily commute.
● Concern that Detroit’s share of taxes raised through the millage would support the QLine (M1-Rail) in 2027 and after.

What are the next steps from the Transit Justice Team?

If the RTA’s Regional Master Transit Plan is up for reconsideration, we will advocate that any plan must include Detroiters having a greater say. That means the RTA must offer more opportunities for Detroiters to provide input and foster participation in the planning process. Most importantly, the RTA must make an effort to include improving DDOT service as a main priority, and we seek the elimination of the financial allocation committee – which takes funding power away from Detroit and leave it to the mercy of suburbanite decision-makers.

The lack of adequate public transit in Detroit is a civil rights issue that has been ongoing for far too long. We will continue to organize bus riders around achieving transit justice, to ensure not only Detroiters have a greater say in the Regional Master Transit Plan, but that DDOT must continue to expand and improve service for ALL bus riders in the city, especially for individuals with disabilities and the elderly.

We will advocate to build more bus shelters, and upgrade facilities that service bus riders, and to continue to increase frequency, reduce commute times, and to provide better customer service for passengers. With winter on the way, NO bus rider in Detroit should have to endure long waits and long commute times. Transit justice is ensuring that Detroiters can access the vital institutions and be able to move freely around the city and the region.

“All neighborhoods deserve access and quality public transit!”
Join our Movement for Transit Justice!
transit@detroitpeoplesplatform.org
313.398.9396

People’s Platform Transit news – November 2016 – More: detroitpeoplesplatform.org

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Read the ‘Enhanced’ Ordinance – Proposal B on the November ballot

S U M M A R Y
AN ORDINANCE to amend Chapter 14 of the 1984 Detroit City Code, Community Development, by adding Article XII, titled Community Benefits, which consists of Sections 14-12-1 through 14-12-5, to provide for the purpose and applicability of this article; to provide for definitions of terms used in this article; to require community engagement and community benefit for certain development projects seeking public support for investment above certain threshold levels; to provide for exemptions for applicability of the article, and to provide for enforcement of the article.

BY COUNCIL MEMBER__________________________________________:

AN ORDINANCE to amend Chapter 14 of the 1984 Detroit City Code, Community Development, by adding Article XII, titled Community Benefits, which consists of Sections 14-12-1 through 14-12-5, to provide for the purpose and applicability of this article; to provide for definitions of terms used in this article; to require community engagement and community benefit for certain development projects seeking public support for investment above certain threshold levels; to provide for exemptions for applicability of the article, and to provide for enforcement of the article.

IT IS HEREBY ORDAINED BY THE PEOPLE OF THE CITY OF DETROIT THAT:
Section 1. Chapter 14 of the 1984 Detroit City Code, Community Development, is amended by adding Article XII, Community Benefits, which consists of Sections 14-12-1 through 14-12-5, to read as follows:

CHAPTER 14. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
ARTICLE XII. COMMUNITY BENEFITS

Sec. 14-12-1. Purpose; Title
(a) The City is committed to community outreach and engagement that promotes transparency and accountability and ensures development projects in the City of Detroit benefit and promote economic growth and prosperity for all residents.
(b) This article shall be known as the “Detroit Community Benefits Ordinance.”
Sec. 14-12-2. Definitions
Community Benefits Provision means the agreement made by and between the Planning Director and the Developer which specifically addresses the issues raised by the NAC.

Enforcement Committee means a committee led by the City’s Corporation Counsel and composed of representatives from the Planning and Development Department, Law Department, Human Rights Department, and other relevant City departments as determined by the Planning Director.

Impact Area means an area determined by the Planning Director that includes all census tracts or census block groups in which the Tier 1 Project is located, and any other areas as determined by the Planning Director.

NAC means the Neighborhood Advisory Council.

Planning Director means the Director of the City of Detroit’s Planning and Development Department, or a member of the Planning Director’s staff working on behalf of the Planning Director.

Tier 1 Development Project means a development project in the City that is expected to incur the investment of Seventy-five Million Dollars ($75,000,000) or more during the construction of facilities, or to begin or expand operations or renovate structures, where the developer of the project is negotiating public support for investment in one or both of the following forms:
(1) Any transfer to the developer of City-owned land parcels that have a cumulative market value of One Million Dollars ($1,000,000) or more (as determined by the City Assessor or independent appraisal), without open bidding and priced below market rates (where allowed by law); or
(2) Provision or approval by the City of tax abatements or other tax breaks that abate more than One Million Dollars ($1,000,000) of City taxes over the term of the abatement that inure directly to the Developer, but not including Neighborhood Enterprise Zone tax abatements.

Tier 2 Development Project means a development project in the City that does not qualify as a Tier 1 Project and is expected to incur the investment of Three Million Dollars ($3,000,000) or more, during the construction of facilities, or to begin or expand operations or renovate structures, where the Developer is negotiating public support for investment in one or both of the following forms:

(1) Land transfers that have a cumulative market value of Three Hundred Thousand Dollars ($300,000) or more (as determined by the City Assessor or independent appraisal), without open bidding and priced below market rates; or
(2) Tax abatements that abate more than Three Hundred Thousand Dollars ($300,000) of City taxes over the term of the abatement that inure directly to the Developer, but not including Neighborhood Enterprise Zone tax abatements.

Sec. 14-12-3. Tier 1 Projects.

(a) Community Engagement Process for Public Meeting.
(1) Prior to submitting to City Council a request for approval of Land transfers or Tax abatements related to a Tier 1 Project, the Planning Director shall hold at least one public meeting in the Impact Area as defined in this Section.
(2) The City Clerk shall forward notice of the public meeting via First Class Mail no less than 10 days before such meeting to all City of Detroit residents within three hundred radial feet of the Tier 1 Project. The notice shall include:
a. The time, date and location of the public meeting;
b. General information about the Tier 1 Project;
c. A description of the Impact Area and the location of the Tier 1 Project;
d. Information related to potential impacts of the Tier 1 Project and possible mitigation strategies; and
(3) In addition to the notice requirement contained in Subsection (2) of this section, the Planning Director shall work with the District Council Member or Members representing the district or districts where the Tier 1 Project is located and at least one At-large Council Member to ensure that local residents, businesses, and organizations, especially those located in the Impact Area and those expected to be directly impacted by the Tier 1 Project are informed of the public meeting.
(4) At the public meeting, the Planning Director will present general information about the Tier 1 Project, discuss ways in which the Tier 1 Project is anticipated to impact the local community, and ways in which the Developer and the Planning Director plan to address or mitigate these impacts.
(5) City Council shall appoint a liaison from the Legislative Policy Division to monitor the community engagement process and provide updates to City Council.
(6) The Planning Director shall provide notice to the liaison of all upcoming meetings and activities associated with the community engagement process related to the Tier 1 Project.

(b) Neighborhood Advisory Council.
(1) The Planning Director will accept nominations to the NAC from any person that resides in the Impact Area.
(2) All residents over the age of 18 that reside in the Impact Area are eligible for nomination.
(3) The NAC shall consist of nine members, selected as follows:
a. Two Members selected by residents of the Impact Area chosen from the resident nominated candidates;
b. Four Members selected by the Planning Director from the resident nominated candidates, with preference given to individuals the Planning Director expects to be directly impacted by the Tier 1 Project;
c. One Member selected by the Council Member in whose district contains the largest portion of the Impact Area from the resident nominated candidates; and
d. One Member selected by the At-Large Council Members from the resident nominated candidates.
(4) If the Planning Director receives less than nine nominations, the Planning Director may seek out additional nominations from individuals that live outside the Impact Area but within the City Council district or districts where the Tier 1 Project is located.
(5) All actions of the NAC may be taken with the consent of a majority of NAC members serving.

(c) Engagement with Developer.
(1) In addition to the meeting required in Subsection (a)(1) of this section, the Planning Director shall facilitate at least one meeting between the NAC and the Developer to allow the NAC to learn more details about the project and to provide an opportunity for the NAC to make Developer aware of concerns raised by the NAC.
(2) City Council by a 2/3 vote of members present or the Planning Director may facilitate additional meetings which the Developer, or the Developer’s designee, shall participate in as directed.
(3) As part of community engagement the developer, or their designee, shall be required to meet as directed.

(d) Community Benefits Report.
(1) The Planning Director shall provide a Community Benefits Report to City Council regarding the Tier 1 Project prior to the request for any approvals related to the Tier 1 Project.
(2) The Community Benefits Report shall contain:
a. A detailed account of how notice was provided to organize the public meeting.
b. A list of the NAC members, and how they were selected.
c. An itemized list of the concerns raised by the NAC.
d. A method for addressing each of the concerns raised by the NAC, or why a particular concern will not be addressed.
(3) The Planning Director, where possible, shall provide a copy of the Community Benefits Report to the NAC prior to submission to City Council.
(4) To ensure an expeditious community engagement process, the Planning Director, where possible, shall submit the initial Community Benefits Report within six weeks from the date the notice is sent of the public meeting.
(5) The Planning Director shall work with City Council to assure that, to the maximum extent possible, all of the approvals required of City Council may be considered simultaneously and subject to one approval vote.
(6) The Planning Director shall work with other City departments to facilitate that Tier 1 Projects receive expedited City-required approvals.

(e) Development Agreement.
(1) All development agreements made between the Developer and the City related to the land transfers or tax abatements associated with a Tier 1 Project shall include the Community Benefits Provision, which shall include:
a. Enforcement mechanisms for failure to adhere to Community Benefits Provision, that may include but are not limited to, clawback of City-provided benefits, revocation of land transfers or land sales, debarment provisions and proportionate penalties and fees; and
b. The procedure for community members to report violations of the Community Benefits Provision to the NAC.
c. The length of time that Annual Compliance Reports as outlined in Subsection (f)(2) of this section, are required to be submitted.
d. Continued community engagement or community meeting requirements.
(2) The Developer shall not be required to enter into a legally binding agreement with any individual or organization other than the City for the express purpose of fulfilling the requirements of this ordinance or other City-mandated community engagement processes.
(3) The Developer may voluntarily enter into any contract or agreement related to the Tier 1 Project that does not pose a conflict of interest with the City.

(f) Enforcement.
(1) An Enforcement Committee shall be established to monitor Tier 1 Projects.
a. The Enforcement Committee shall be comprised of, at minimum, the following four individuals:
i. Corporation Counsel for the City of Detroit; or their designee.
ii. a representative from the Planning and Development Department;
iii. a representative from the Law Department;
iv. a representative from the Human Rights Department.
b. In addition to the members of the Enforcement Committee as identified in Subsection (1)a of this section, the Planning Director may require that other departments participate in the Enforcement Committee as needed.
(2) The Enforcement Committee shall provide a biannual compliance report to the City Council and the NAC for the time period identified in the Community Benefits Provision.
(3) The Planning Director shall facilitate at least one meeting per calendar year between the NAC and the Developer to discuss the status of the Tier 1 Project for the time period identified in the Community Benefits Provision.
(4) The NAC shall review any allegations of violations of the Community Benefits Provision provided to it by the community, and may report violations to the Enforcement Committee in writing.
(5) Upon receipt of written notification of allegations of violation from the NAC, the Enforcement Committee shall investigate such allegations and shall present their written findings to the NAC based upon the following:
a. Whether the Developer is in compliance with the Community Benefits Provision; and
b. How the Community Benefits Provision will be enforced or how violations will be mitigated.
(6) The findings of the Enforcement Committee shall be presented to the NAC no later than 21 days from the date the violations were reported to the Enforcement Committee, unless the need for additional time is reported to City Council and the NAC within the original 21 day time frame.
(7) If the NAC disagrees with the findings of the Enforcement Committee or determines that the Enforcement Committee is not diligently pursuing the enforcement or mitigation steps outlined in its findings, the NAC may send notice to the Enforcement Committee, and the Enforcement Committee shall have 14 days from receipt of notice to respond to the concerns outlined.
(8) If the NAC is not satisfied with the Enforcement Committee’s response, the NAC may petition the City Clerk and request that City Council schedule a hearing with opportunity for both the Enforcement Committee and the NAC to present information related to the alleged violations of the Community Benefits Provision and any enforcement or mitigation efforts that have occurred.
(9) If City Council elects to hold a hearing, or based upon the written information 22 submitted, City Council shall determine whether the Enforcement Committee has made reasonable efforts to ensure that the Developer has complied with the Community Benefits Provision.
a. If City Council determines that the Enforcement Committee has made reasonable efforts, City Council shall notify the NAC and the Enforcement Committee of their findings.
b. If City Council finds that the Enforcement Committee has not made reasonable efforts, City Council shall make specific finding to the Enforcement Committee on the steps that need to be taken to comply with the Community Benefits Provision.
i. The Enforcement Committee shall provide City Council and the NAC monthly updates on compliance actions until City Council adopts a resolution declaring that the Developer is in compliance with the Community Benefits Provision or has taken adequate steps to mitigate violations.
ii. City Council may hold additional hearings related to enforcement of the Community Benefits Provision as needed.

(g) Development projects that are allowed as by-right or conditional land uses under the Detroit Zoning Ordinance and located downtown, the area bounded by the Detroit River and the center lines of Brooklyn Avenue (extended), West Jefferson Avenue, Eighth Street, West Fort Street, Brooklyn Avenue, Porter Street, John C. Lodge Freeway (M-10), Fisher Freeway (I-75), Chrysler Freeway (I-375), East Jefferson, Rivard Street, Atwater Street, and Riopelle Street extended to the Detroit River do not qualify as Tier 1 Projects.

Sec. 14-12-4. Tier 2 Projects.
(a) Developers shall:
(1) Partner with the City, and when appropriate, a workforce development agency to promote the hiring, training and employability of Detroit residents consistent with State and Federal Law.
(2) Partner with the Planning Director to address and mitigate negative impact that the Tier 2 Project may have on the community and local residents.
(b) The Developer’s commitment as identified in Subsection (a) of this section shall be included in the development agreements related to any land transfers or tax abatements associated with the Tier 2 Project for which the Developer seeks approval.

Sec. 14-12-5. Exemptions.
The requirements of this ordinance may be waived by resolution of the City Council upon submission by either the Planning Director or the Developer identifying reasons that the requirements of this ordinance are impractical or infeasible and identifying how the Developer will otherwise provide community benefits.

Section 2. All ordinances, or parts of ordinances, that conflict with this ordinance are 1 repealed.
Section 3. This ordinance is declared necessary for the preservation of the public peace, health, safety, and welfare of the People of the City of Detroit.
Section 4. The article added by this ordinance has been enacted as comprehensive local legislation. It is intended to be the sole and exclusive law regarding its subject matter, subject to provisions of state law.

Approved as to form:

_____________________________
Melvin B. Hollowell
Corporation Counsel

#END

Read the People’s CBO

http://detroitpeoplesplatform.org/read-the-peoples-cbo-proposal-a-on-the-november-ballot/

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Transit Newsletter & EARNED PAID SICK DAYS

NEW! TRANSIT NEWSLETTER

We have compiled this newsletter to provide you with the latest updates in local transit. Included is a timeline of recent transit history and a breakdown of Proposal One, a bill that among many changes will raise additional funds for public transit.

-We at the People’s Platform, in partnership with North End Woodward Community Coalition (NEWCC) seek a just transportation system that is respectful of and accessible to all transit riders; our current system does not reflect this commitment.

– Public transit is crucial piece of the public commons; it is a public good, paid for with public dollars. The benefits of transit investments must be broadly shared by the public.

-Since 2010, 30% of DDOT’s services have been cut. These cuts are hurting Detroit households and result in job loss and lack of access to medical facilities and schools. These cuts further isolate many Detroit neighborhoods, thus creating two Detroits.

-It is our duty to advocate for a just system and hold our leaders acountable to providing fair, accessible, and afford- able transit options for all Detroiters.

Are you are passionate about improving our public bus system, organizing your community in demanding accountability and changes, or just simply passionate about public transit and the wide benefits it provides?

We at Detroit People’s Platform, in partnership with NEWCC,
NEED YOU and YOUR VOICE! We need all community voices involved, as there are many changes heading our way. Keep Detroit in the conversation!

Contact
313.338.9396
transit@detroitpeoplesplatform.org
northendwoodward.org

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TransitNewsletterTimeline

JOIN THE FIGHT FOR EARNED PAID SICK DAYS FOR EVERY WORKER

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Photostory: Detroiters About to Lose Their Homes Visit the Home of the Wayne County Treasurer for Prayer Vigil

Photostory: Detroiters About to Lose Their Homes Visit the Home of the Wayne County Treasurer for Prayer Vigil

Detroit, the largest majority African-American major city in the country now faces the largest forced housing eviction, possibly in the history of the United States. Wayne County Treasurer Wojtowicz is preparing to foreclose on 37,000 occupied homes affecting nearly 100,000 people, the equivalent of 1/6 of the city’s population. Many Detroiters and Wayne County Residents are being foreclosed upon due to incorrect tax bills with exaggerated property assessments and disputed water bill liens. Persistent and high rates of unemployment, government cuts to services Detroiters rely on and increased displacement and forced relocation will result in enormous physical and mental stress and trauma on children and families. As of today, the Treasurer has not done that which is fully in his power, to stop the foreclosures.

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To build community trust and unity of expression and intent, vigil agreements we proposed and accepted when those participating staged the action at Eastern Market. The location of the vigil, the Wayne County Treasurers home, was not announced publicly until the participants began to get on the bus.

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Denise Kennedy, of the Princeton Street Block Club and Rev Joan Ross of the Equitable Detroit Coalition attempt to deliver thousands of petitions to Raymond Wojtowicz, the Wayne County Treasurer who has the power to stop the largest mass tax foreclosure in US history. The woman who answered the door refused to accept the petitions and told Mrs Kennedy and Rev Ross to get off the porch.

IMG_1540Last night 50 Detroiters and Wayne County residents visited the home of Raymond Wojtowicz, the Wayne County Treasurer who has the power to stop the largest mass tax foreclosure in US history.

IMG_1566Today, Tuesday March 31st, Join Detroit People’s Platform members and supporters in our Call for National Outrage!

People from around the country are flooding Detroit Mayor Duggan’s office with calls, messages and on social media demand he remove all tax liens for past-due water bills. They are also be calling, messaging and addressing Wayne County Treasurer-Elect Wojtowicz (Voy Toe Vich) on social media to demand that he stop the displacement of families in the largest tax foreclosure in one city, at one time, in US history.

Mayor Duggan
(313) 224-3400
emailmayorduggan@detroitmi.gov
@MayorMikeDuggan

Treasurer-Elect Wojtowicz
(313) 224-5990
taxinfo@waynecounty.com
@waynecountymi

#PeoplesPlatform #OurCity

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Detroiters Working to Keep Families in their Homes Pack Council Meeting

Detroiters Working to Keep Families in their Homes Pack Council Meeting

News from The People’s Platform

Detroiters Working to Keep Families in their Homes Pack Council Meeting
Almost one sixth of population could be kicked out of their homes

DETROIT – Members of the Detroit People’s Platform were among those that packed a Detroit City Council meeting to support a resolution for a moratorium on home tax foreclosures in Detroit.  March 31 could mark the day that Detroit sets the record for the largest number of tax foreclosures in US History on a single day. About 100,000 people could be forced from their homes because of tax foreclosures from Wayne County. Families threatened with losing their homes because of their Wayne County tax bill were among many that spoke out at the Council meeting.

PlatformAtCouncil

Platform Members and supporters at City Council Meeting to present a People’s Resolution, Petition Signatures and public comment on the Mass Tax Foreclosure planned next week in Detroit. Photo Credit detroitcommunicator.com

The Detroit People’s Platform turned in thousands of petition signatures from people calling for a moratorium on foreclosure. Platform members also read a People’s Resolution to Stop the Foreclosures that shared the demands of impacted residents, community groups and the Economic Justice Alliance of Michigan (EJAM), Equitable Detroit Coalition (EDC), Storehouse of Hope, North End Woodward Community Coalition (NEWCC), and the Sugar Law Center for Economic and Social Justice.

“Detroit families have added keeping their homes to list of struggles people are facing every day such as water shut offs and poor public transportation,” said Linda Campbell of the Detroit People’s Platform. “It is essential that the Detroit City Council join with their constituents to hold this city together. We can’t tolerate thousands of hard working people becoming homeless.”

"PUBLIC COMMENT: THE PEOPLE'S PLATFORM... STOP THE FORECLOSURE" Linda Campbell, Building Movement, Detroit People's Platform reads a People's Resolution into the public record and presents thousands of signatires to Detroit City Council, March 24, 2015 Photo Credit: Detroit Council Pres. Brenda Jones Facebook Page

“PUBLIC COMMENT: THE PEOPLE’S PLATFORM… STOP THE FORECLOSURE” Linda Campbell, Building Movement, Detroit People’s Platform reads a People’s Resolution into the public record and presents thousands of signatures to Detroit City Council, March 24, 2015 Photo Credit: Detroit Council Pres. Brenda Jones Facebook Page

Those working to keep Wayne County tax foreclosures from creating yet another crisis in the city are asking for a moratorium on foreclosures to allow newly enacted safeguards to kick in. Council Member Castañeda-López put forth for a Council Resolution of the Foreclosure Crisis on Monday, March 24 and it is currently being prepared. Council will vote on the resolution this week.

“We have new tax laws that haven’t had time to work and we know property in Detroit has been over-assessed resulting in unfair tax bills,” said Aaron Handelsman of the Detroit People’s Platform. “It’s really only fair that the new laws and fair values be used before thousands are summarily ejected from their homes.”

PlatformResolutionAaron

“PUBLIC COMMENT: the Detroit People’s Platform…. That a halt be placed on all Tax Foreclosures for a one year, remove all tax liens for past due water bills, pass a Community Benefits Agreement Ordinance that insures pair and equitable development and Promote Housing Security by enacting a Community Land Trust policy and redefining Neighborhood Affordability to reflect the economic reality of low income communities.” Aaron Handelsman, Detroit People’s Platform reads a People’s Resolution into the public record at Detroit City Council, March 24, 2015 Photo Credit: Detroit Council Pres. Brenda Jones Facebook Page

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Sign the Petition!

Take ActionWayne County Treasurer-elect Wojtowicz is in charge of foreclosing on 37,000 occupied homes for overdue property taxes on March 31st, affecting nearly 100,000 people. This represents the largest mass tax foreclosure in US history in one city at one time. Treasurer Wojtowicz has the power to stop it.

Detroiters are being foreclosed upon due to incorrect tax bills with exaggerated property assessments and disputed water bill liens.

Long-time residents are the heart and soul of Detroit. Ongoing displacement of our families from mortgage and tax foreclosures has been devastating. Public services are being cut and privatized, and Detroiters are being pushed out of their generational homes. To now lose another 100,000 residents would cut the city’s total population by 1/6 and tear a hole in the city’s cultural and economic fabric that can never be replaced.

Sign the petition to let the Wayne County Treasurer know that 100,000 Detroit residents need a place to call home!