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Update: Rental Regulation Ordinance

Update: Rental Regulation Ordinance

In October of 2017, Detroit City Council voted unanimously on an ordinance to toughen rental regulations. The ordinance could greatly impact many renters and increase displacement. The city is implementing the ordinance through the neighborhoods by zip code. They  started with 48215 on the East Side February 1st. 

Downtown, Midtown and New Center are changing rapidly. While many have called for equal investment and treatment in our neighborhoods, as the city’s develops policy to focus on  neighborhoods are they doing enough to protect those who are already living there? 

[bctt tweet=”In order to shift investment into more that just greater downtown and historic neighborhoods of affluence, areas of the city have been and are being “cleaned up” so that they are more appealing to investors and new settlers. #Detroit ” via=”no”]

The policies being developed are double-edged. The RRO process will successfully bring rentals up to code, but at what cost? The ordinance is written in such a way that it’s success could reduce already hard to find low income housing. 

Download the full pdf

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Demand Mayor Duggan #KeepTheWaterOn for Detroit’s Children

Demand Mayor Duggan #KeepTheWaterOn for Detroit’s Children

Two weeks ago, in Mayor Duggan’s State of the City address (SOTC, March 6, 2018), he emphasized his intention to make Detroit a more kid-friendly city. Yesterday, the Free Press reported that 17,461 Detroit households were at risk for water shutoffs.

In his SOTC Mayor Duggan stated “We are going to make sure our kids not only go to school but they succeed at school,” but can kids succeed at school without water at home? 

[bctt tweet=”In his SOTC @MayorMikeDuggan stated “We are going to make sure our kids not only go to school but they succeed at school,” but can kids succeed at school without water at home? #KeepTheWaterOn #Detroit” username=””]

[bctt tweet=”@MayorMikeDuggan also talked about the future and how #Detroit children have been forgotten, but how many of these children will be left without water? #KeepTheWaterOn” via=”no”]

[bctt tweet=”Local water activist worked for more than a year to urge public health officials and @MayorMikeDuggan to protect households with children from water shutoffs. Their request was rejected. #Keepthewateron #Detroit” via=”no”]

Color of Change is supporting a local petition to address the water shut offs in Brightmoor and throughout the city. We encourage Detroit People’s Platform members and supporters to sign the petition and to contact the Mayor directly or through social media.

[bctt tweet=”Demand that @MayorMikeDuggan take real action to protect our children from water shutoffs instead using them as a talking point. #KeepTheWaterOn #Detroit” via=”no”]

Read more:
Controversial water shutoffs could hit 17,461 Detroit households
https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/detroit/2018/03/26/more-than-17-000-detroit-households-risk-water-shutoffs/452801002/

Mayor Mike Duggan to Detroit children: ‘We want you to stay’
https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/detroit/2018/03/06/mayor-mike-duggan-detroit-children-state-city/400824002/

What you can do right now?

Sign the petition: Keep the water on in Brightmoor
https://campaigns.organizefor.org/petitions/keep-the-water-on-in-brightmoor?bucket&source=facebook-share-button&time=1522097001

Contact Mayor Duggan
(313) 224-3400 – @MayorMikeDuggan – emailmike@detroitmi.gov

Are you facing water shutoff?
Do you want to support Detroit water activists and get involved?

We the People of Detroit
http://wethepeopleofdetroit.com

People’s Water Board Coalition
https://www.peopleswaterboard.org

 

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This week’s media round up – Share these this weekend

This week’s media round up – Share these this weekend

THIS WEEK

March 22, 2018 – Michigan State Fairgrounds deal leaves Detroit picking up developer’s tab

https://www.metrotimes.com/news-hits/archives/2018/03/22/the-michigan-state-fairgrounds-sale-is-a-raw-deal-for-detroit-residents-say

The Land Bank says the inflated cost for the city is the result of years of additional maintenance that had to be done on the site due to continued delays by Magic Plus, LLC. The preliminary agreement that had Magic Plus buying the full parcel for $4.65 million was struck in late 2013 with plans for the company to fulfill a series of requirements by the end of 2015 so construction could start shortly thereafter. But Magic Plus delayed the process for years — forcing the state to extend the agreement seven times as it paid about a million a year to maintain the land for possible development. Since that initial 2015 deadline, the state has paid more than $2.3 million to maintain the site — and it now plans to have Detroit pick up the cost.

“This just smacks of a sweetheart deal between the state and Magic Plus,” says Frank Hammer with the Greenacres Woodward Civic Association, a group representing the neighborhood across from the site. “The taxpayers are the ones left paying the tab for delays that were caused by the developer.”

March 22, 2018 – If Ford buys Michigan Central Station, what happens to land nearby?

https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/detroit/2018/03/22/detroit-train-station-ford-corktown/443088002/

“Over the years, there have been so many rumors about development happening in that community,” said Linda Campbell of the Equitable Detroit Coalition. “My first reaction is always, what will this development mean for residents in the community and nearby communities and the city of Detroit at large? What kind of public investment — if any — will be made? Is it something that will get taxpayers on the hook for corporate development? These are details we need to take a look at as citizens to see if this is truly a development project that is going to make a difference for the everyday Detroiter.”

How a community benefits agreement would shape any Ford deal is unclear. So far in Detroit, only six projects have been subjected to the law — four of them Dan Gilbert initiatives. The end results, according to a new report from WDET, have been a lot of talk and not many actual benefits.

 

March 19, 2018 – Detroit’s failed CBA Ordinance “Wildly Exceeds” Council Member’s Expectations

http://detroitpeoplesplatform.org/2018/03/detroits-failed-cba-ordinance-wildly-exceeds-council-members-expectations/

This morning, Monday March 19, WDET ran a report on Detroit’s Community Benefits Ordinance. During the report Council Member Scott Benson stated that the CBA Ordinance had “wildly exceeded” his expectations. Please take a moment and call or reach out through social media to let Council Member Benson know that the CBA Ordinance is NOT working for Detroiters.

In spite of hours of meeting and talking with developers Detroiters have not seen one legitimate benefit.

 

March 19, 2018 – Detroit’s Community Benefits Ordinance Yields Hours of Dialogue and Almost No Community Benefits

https://wdet.org/posts/2018/03/19/86319-detroits-community-benefits-ordinance-yields-hours-of-dialogue-and-almost-no-community-benefits/

WDET found the city last year conducted over 28 meetings for the community benefits ordinance process. The conversations between community members and developers resulted in mitigating the negative impacts of the new construction and in some cases developers making tweaks to their plans. But, after all was said and done, the first year of Detroit’s Community Benefits ordinance yielded almost no community benefits that the city can enforce. And there’s debate about whether the law is effectively giving voice to community concerns or resulting in tangible neighborhood amenities.

March 19, 2018 – Was the First Year of Detroit’s Community Benefits Ordinance Successful?

https://wdet.org/posts/2018/03/19/86542-was-the-first-year-of-detroits-community-benefits-ordinance-successful/

Amina Kirk, a legal advisor with advocacy group Detroit People’s Platform, attended many of the community benefits meetings and interviewed Neighborhood Advisory Council members about their experience. Kirk is disappointed with the lack of community benefits to come from the process and says many residents expressed not knowing what kinds of things they could ask from the developer. “One of [the Detroit People’s Platform] recommendations is that the city should provide examples of actual community benefits agreements from other cities to NACs so they can see what this looks like in real life.”

EARLIER THIS MONTH

March 13, 2018 – Dan, Mike, and the women of Detroit

https://www.metrotimes.com/detroit/dan-mike-and-the-women-of-detroit/Content?oid=10111911

Petty has a practice of speaking truth to power. Shortly before catching that headline I had just watched a video of the Detroit People’s Platform People’s Response to the State of the City, led by Petty.

Duggan had delivered the State of the City speech on Tuesday, March 6 evening. The response addressed issues such as transportation, affordable housing, and water shutoffs.

“Historically and during my entire life, black women have been engaged in every aspect of struggle in Detroit,” Petty says. “There are mothers sharing water hoses through their windows for families suffering water shutoffs. There are women cooking meals for the children on their block whose parents are working double shifts to try to make ends meet. I have witnessed and experienced Detroit women opening up their homes to children and families with no other place to go. I hesitate to call these responses progressive because this has just been the way that Detroit women have showed up for each other and their city for as long as I can remember.”

March 13, 2018 – Time to reconsider Detroit’s weak community benefits ordinance

https://www.freep.com/story/opinion/contributors/2018/03/13/detroit-development-community-benefits-ordinance/414944002/

Since Detroit is the largest majority African American city in the nation with many families at or near the poverty line, and most developers are wealthy and white, there are questions regarding race, and who gets the contracts, who gets the jobs and who gets left out.

March 13, 2018 – Spotlight on the News: The campaign to “Promote the Vote” & the future of the MI. State Fairgrounds

https://www.wxyz.com/news/political/spotlight-on-the-news/spotlight-on-the-news-the-campaign-to-promote-the-vote-the-future-of-the-mi-state-fairgrounds

WXYZ Detroit – On Sunday, March 11, Spotlight on the News will look at “Promote the Vote”, the petition drive campaign to amend the Michigan Constitution to make “voting more accessible, secure and fair,” according to its supporters.   Attorneys Kary Moss of the Michigan ACLU and Kahlilah Spencer of the NAACP will be our guests.

We’ll also look at the future of the Michigan State Fairgrounds in Detroit.  Karen & Frank Hammer will explain the role their neighborhood coalition is playing in the possible development of the 160 acres near the intersection of Woodward Avenue and Eight Mile Road.

March 7, 2018 – In State of the City, Duggan talks schools, jobs, and “building one Detroit”

http://michiganradio.org/post/state-city-duggan-talks-schools-jobs-and-building-one-detroit

But some of Duggan’s critics said his speech and policies are still disconnected from the everyday reality of most Detroiters.

Kea Mathis, a community organizer with the group Detroit People’s Platform, said Duggan’s speech left her with “a lot of questions,” and a sense that “wrongs that need to be righted” for many longtime Detroiters are still being ignored.

“Why did you demolish houses instead of putting people in houses?” said Mathis, saying questions about the propriety of past mass tax foreclosures in particular still have yet to be addressed. “He talked about more bus routes, but for people that actually ride the bus, there are problems of access, of cleanliness, a lack of bus shelters.”

“We’re tired of hearing about so-called improvements, but anything that really makes a city thrive…those things are not addressed.”

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Transit Update Public Transit A Choice or Right?

Transit Update Public Transit A Choice or Right?

[bctt tweet=”As a new Regional Transit Plan is discussed it’s vital we consider ESSENTIAL Riders. Lack of equity in bus service and planning replicates the racism that has historically plagued our transit policy.” via=”no”]

Public transit is a hot topic. The lack of adequate transit has been cited for Amazon’s rejection. Many don’t connect this failure to the race-based policies of our region. There are many recent examples of the shift toward private service and choice options rather than equity for essential riders. [bctt tweet=”Quicken Loans, Wayne State and Henry Ford could use their influence to promote a robust DDOT system rather than use private shuttles.” via=”no”] Also, Quicken and others decided to use our public tax dollars – over $70 million from state, local, and federal funds to build the QLine.  The reliance on public services and the diversion of public funds contributes to inequality.

A modern public transit system responds to the needs of a diverse population. There are as many types of riders as there are people. Here we consider two particular types of bus riders – Essential & Choice Riders…

Essential riders ride the bus for their day-to-day economic and social survival.  They use transit to get to important institutions like schools, banks or credit unions, social services, healthcare, and jobs. They endure neighborhood service that is unreliable, slow, and unavailable when needed most. Essential bus riders have various personal circumstances that make car ownership impossible.

“Choice-rider” is an industry term used by public transit providers that refers to individuals that ride the bus as an option. Choice riders may have access and the means to afford and use a car, but instead “choose” to ride the bus. More often than not They also have the option to use smartphone app-based ride-hailing services like UBER and LYFT.

Public transit authorities cater to choice riders to lure them out of cars and into public transit.  They fit buses with amenities like Wi-Fi, app-based fare and boarding technology, and offer express/commuter routes from more affluent neighborhoods to business/employment districts

Some new services only get people from around the region in and around downtown. These services often give choice riders the option to bypass the very neighborhoods where services are inadequate for Essential riders. [bctt tweet=”This lack of equity in bus service and planning replicates the racism that has historically plagued our transit policy in #Detroit and the region.  ” via=”no”]

A just and equitable  public transit system serves all types of riders. 

Here are some signs that Essential Riders suffer from transit injustice

  • Nearly flat funding has been maintained for DDOT, at $135 million with little emphasis on improving the State Fair Transit Center & little improvement for bus stops & shelters.
  • The creation of routes  that serve areas targeted for investment  with express/commuter service.
  • The expansion of night and weekend service prioritizes main roads and neighborhoods where new population increases are planned.
  • The failure to improve service in all neighborhoods forces families & individuals to ride for hours on a disconnected, under-resourced & unreliable bus system.

Transit Justice is a Civil Rights Issue

The struggle for civil rights and racial equity in public transportation is rooted in the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott which successfully challenged and ended bus segregation. This gave birth to the modern Civil Rights Movement and resulted in the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Title VI regulations that ensure bus riders are not discriminated on the basis of race, color, creed, gender, and ability/disability status.

It’s in the City Charter!

“The people have a right to expect city government to provide for its residents, decent housing; job opportunities; convenient and comfortable transportation; recreational facilities and activities; cultural enrichment, including libraries and art and historical museums; clean air and waterways, safe drinking water and a sanitary, environmentally sound city.”

“The people have a right to know the rules and regulations governing dealings between the City and the public and to a means for review of administrative decisions.”

Download an easy to print black and white version of this Transit Update to share with your neighbors. 
[wpdm_package id=’2705′]

Take Action! Make Some Calls! Share it Out!

City Council Members

Mayor Duggan

DDOT Leadership

[bctt tweet=”We demand participatory decision-making between riders/residents and DDOT for input on routes and changes in fares and scheduling. #Detroit” via=”no”]

Bus riders must have a say!

Join the Detroit People’s
Platform Transit Justice Team!
Contact Renard Monczunski
renard@detroitpeoplesplatform.org
(313) 338-9396

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Detroit’s failed CBA Ordinance “Wildly Exceeds” Council Member’s Expectations

Detroit’s failed CBA Ordinance “Wildly Exceeds” Council Member’s Expectations

This morning, Monday March 19, WDET ran a report on Detroit’s Community Benefits Ordinance. During the report Council Member Scott Benson stated that the CBA Ordinance had “wildly exceeded” his expectations. Please take a moment and call or reach out through social media to let Council Member Benson know that the CBA Ordinance is NOT working for Detroiters. 

In spite of hours of meeting and talking with developers Detroiters have not seen one legitimate benefit.

 

Learn more about why Detroiters need REAL community benefits and why we are calling for Detroit City Council to amend the CBA Ordinance. 

 

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Free Press: Time to reconsider Detroit’s weak community benefits ordinance

Free Press: Time to reconsider Detroit’s weak community benefits ordinance

Time to reconsider Detroit’s weak community benefits ordinance

https://www.freep.com/story/opinion/contributors/2018/03/13/detroit-development-community-benefits-ordinance/414944002/

 

In 2016, Detroit’s grassroots activists made history: After three years of struggle, we placed Proposal A, a Community Benefits Ordinance, on the ballot. It garnered nearly 100,000 votes. But the proposal that would make Detroit the first city to enact a city-wide Community Benefits Ordinance (CBO), is a virtually hollow one. Well-heeled corporate interests placed Proposal B — an eviscerated community benefits ordinance — on the ballot next to the community proposal. The move caused voter confusion.  The weak proposal won.

Now we need to amend the seriously flawed CBO to recognize Detroiters’ right to have a seat at the table when developers use our public resources for private profit. We need real community benefits.

By definition, community benefits are negotiated between self-organized residents and developers that are using public money for private projects. The negotiations result in legally binding contracts signed by the developers and community representatives. The outcome of such agreements in Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Los Angeles, New York, Atlanta and elsewhere has ranged from jobs for community members to environmental safeguards to protection against being priced out homes.

Since Detroit is the largest majority African American city in the nation with many families at or near the poverty line, and most developers are wealthy and white, there are questions regarding race, and who gets the contracts, who gets the jobs and who gets left out.

There are three main areas where the CBO falls short and must be amended. It needs to be more inclusive of projects and residents, agreements between community and developers must be legally binding and the process must be more transparent.

True and meaningful community representation can only exist when the community chooses its representatives. Under the current community benefit agreement ordinance, the City of Detroit usurps the community role by choosing the majority of those who will represent the community with the developer. [bctt tweet=” This is backwards, anti-democratic and must change.  Those who have “stayed and paid” have a right to meaningful say in development funded with public tax money.” via=”no”]

In fact, if there is a thread that ties all of the needed amendments of the current community benefit ordinance, it is respect. [bctt tweet=”Those of us who have stuck with the city through good times and bad, who have through the years, deserve to have more voice and power in how our city develops” via=”no”]. As stated in a recent article by Andre M. Perry of the Brookings Institution, “It’s hard to seek improvement for a city when its residents aren’t authentically respected.”  Majority black Detroit deserves that respect and amending the current CBO is a good step in that direction.

Monique Tate is a Detroiter that works with Equitable Detroit Coalition, which aims to foster relationships between developers and the Detroit community. 

Tweet it out!

[bctt tweet=”#AmendTheCBA #Detroit In 2016, Detroit’s grassroots activists made history: After three years of struggle, we placed Proposal A, a Community Benefits Ordinance, on the ballot. http://on.freep.com/2Go4xav ” via=”no”]

 

[bctt tweet=”#AmendTheCBA #Detroit It garnered nearly 100,000 votes. But the proposal that would make Detroit the first city to enact a city-wide Community Benefits Ordinance (CBO), is a virtually hollow one. http://on.freep.com/2Go4xav” via=”no”]

 

[bctt tweet=”#AmendTheCBA #Detroit Well-heeled corporate interests placed Proposal B — an eviscerated community benefits ordinance — on the ballot next to the community proposal. The move caused voter confusion.  The weak proposal won. http://on.freep.com/2Go4xav” via=”no”]

 

[bctt tweet=”#AmendTheCBA #Detroit Now we need to amend the seriously flawed CBO to recognize Detroiters’ right to have a seat at the table when developers use our public resources for private profit. We need real community benefits. http://on.freep.com/2Go4xav” username=””]

 

[bctt tweet=”#AmendTheCBA #Detroit By definition, community benefits are negotiated between self-organized residents and developers that are using public money for private projects. http://on.freep.com/2Go4xav” username=””]

 

[bctt tweet=”#AmendTheCBA #Detroit The negotiations result in legally binding contracts signed by the developers and community representatives. http://on.freep.com/2Go4xav” username=””]

 

[bctt tweet=”#AmendTheCBA #Detroit The outcome of such agreements in Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Los Angeles, New York, Atlanta and elsewhere has ranged from jobs for community members to environmental safeguards to protection against being priced out homes. http://on.freep.com/2Go4xav” username=””]

 

[bctt tweet=”#AmendTheCBA #Detroit Since Detroit is the largest majority African American city in the nation with many families at or near the poverty line, and most developers are wealthy and white, there are questions regarding race, and who gets the contracts, who gets the jobs and who gets left out. http://on.freep.com/2Go4xav” username=””]

 

[bctt tweet=”#AmendTheCBA #Detroit There are three main areas where the CBO falls short and must be amended. It needs to be more inclusive of projects and residents, agreements between community and developers must be legally binding and the process must be more transparent. http://on.freep.com/2Go4xav” username=””]

 

[bctt tweet=”#AmendTheCBA #Detroit True and meaningful community representation can only exist when the community chooses its representatives. http://on.freep.com/2Go4xav” username=””]

 

[bctt tweet=”#AmendTheCBA #Detroit Under the current community benefit agreement ordinance, the City of Detroit usurps the community role by choosing the majority of those who will represent the community with the developer. http://on.freep.com/2Go4xav” username=””]

 

[bctt tweet=”#AmendTheCBA #Detroit This is backwards, anti-democratic and must change.  Those who have “stayed and paid” have a right to meaningful say in development funded with public tax money. http://on.freep.com/2Go4xav” username=””]

 

[bctt tweet=”#AmendTheCBA #Detroit In fact, if there is a thread that ties all of the needed amendments of the current community benefit ordinance, it is respect. http://on.freep.com/2Go4xav” username=””]

 

[bctt tweet=”#AmendTheCBA #Detroit Those of us who have stuck with the city through good times and bad, who have through the years cut the grass in abandoned lots, volunteered for neighborhood watch organizations, and raised our kids and cared for our elderly, deserve to have more voice and power in how our city develops. http://on.freep.com/2Go4xav” username=””]

 

[bctt tweet=”#AmendTheCBA #Detroit As stated in a recent article by Andre M. Perry of the Brookings Institution, “It’s hard to seek improvement for a city when its residents aren’t authentically respected.”  http://on.freep.com/2Go4xav” username=””]

 

[bctt tweet=”#AmendTheCBA #Detroit #MajorityBlackDetroit deserves that respect and amending the current CBO is a good step in that direction. http://on.freep.com/2Go4xav” username=””]

 

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Detroit’s current CBA Ordinance must be amended

Detroit’s current CBA Ordinance must be amended

A year of So-called “Community Benefits”

It’s been more than a year since Detroiters went to the polls and voted for Community Benefits. It’s now  possible to amend the current ordinance so that it becomes the powerful tool Detroiters originally created in  Proposal A.

To date, in meetings with developers the Neighborhood Advisory Councils (NACs) are routinely denied the benefits requested for their communities. Three typical request from NACs not met by developers are for more time, greater transparency and more meaningful benefits.

“We are outraged and appalled by the City’s CBO Report. We spent a great deal of time working on our requests, speaking with neighbors, and doing research – not knowing that the entire development plan was already decided.” – NAC Member

The current CBA Ordinance has failed. Detroiters, for the most part are still being left out of the city’s revitalization.  As development expands and targets more Detroit Neighborhoods we need strong commitments to racial equity, which have been missing in revitalization efforts. We need guarantees that money coming in doesn’t mean we will be pushed out.

[bctt tweet=”There has been a total of $832 million in public funds and resources given away since the CBA Ordinance was enacted in 2016. We need to amend the current CBA Ordinance! #Detroit #AmendtheCBA”]

Detroit’s current CBA Ordinance must be amended:

  • Lower the $$$ threshold for project participation
  • Give community more voice in the development process
  • Include a conflict of interest clause
  • Result in legally binding agreements
  • Monitor and enforce clawbacks when developers fail to do what they say.

The transfer of public funds and resources from a majority-black city to white billionaires’ private economic projects is an example of Wealth Stripping. This extraction of public funds and resources without representation must stop. Join the movement to amend the CBA Ordinance.

Visit detroitpeoplesplatform.org to read the full Recommendations for Amendments and more about how a strong amended CBA Ordinance  can be a tool to protect, maintain and empower majority-black Detroit.

Download, Print and Share Equitable Detroit Coalitions Recommendations for Amendments: 

http://detroitpeoplesplatform.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/EDC_CBORecommendationsJan2018.pdf

 

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People’s Response to the State of the City #PeoplesSOTC

People’s Response to the State of the City #PeoplesSOTC

What are the REAL Issues in the nation’s largest Majority-Black City?

On March 6th, Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan will deliver this year’s State of the City address. We are coming together online and in community to offer a People’s Response.

Tuesday, March 6th, 6 – 8:30 p.m.

Join our efforts on social media
#PeoplesSOTC
or come together in community at
7700 Second Ave. at Pallister
free, secure parking

6 p.m. – Food/Social Media Strategy
7 p.m. – Viewing SOTC on a Big Screen/Social Media Action
8 p.m. – People’s Response Press Conference

We’ll view the Mayor’s State of The City address and respond through social media. After the address we’ll host and broadcast the People’s Response Press Conference and hear from people who are living through the REAL state of the city.

FB EVENT: https://www.facebook.com/events/201945927058296/

Promote the People’s Response:
[bctt tweet=”On Tues March 6th, #Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan will deliver this year’s State of the City address. We are coming together online and in community to offer a People’s Response. Join us #PeoplesSOTC http://detroitpeoplesplatform.org/2018/02/peoples-response-to-the-state-of-the-city-peoplessotc/” username=”Detroitpeoples”]

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Redistricting 101 Where You Live Matters

Redistricting 101 Where You Live Matters

Redistricting 101 shares important information about the way voting districts are created, what that looks like in Detroit and across the state of Michigan, their impact on you and your community, and how you can have your voice heard in the process!

Download Print and Share
http://detroitpeoplesplatform.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/Redistricting101digital-3.pdf

[bctt tweet=”Redistricting 101 shares important information about the way voting districts are created, what that looks like in Detroit and across the state of Michigan, their impact on you and your community, and how you can have your voice heard in the process!” via=”no”]

 

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Housing Update – Rental Registration Ordinance

In October of 2017, Detroit City Council voted unanimously on an ordinance to toughen rental regulations. The ordinance will greatly impact Detroit’s most vulnerable renters and increase displacement. The city is implementing the ordinance through the neighborhoods by zip code starting with 48215 on the East Side February 1st. 

The schedule for the first six ZIP codes is as follows:

ZIP Code Launch Date Registration Date Compliance Date
48215 February 1, 2018 May 1, 2018 August 1, 2018
48224 March 1, 2018 June 1, 2018 September 1, 2018
48223 May 1, 2018 August 1, 2018 November 1, 2018
48219 June 1, 2018 September 1, 2018 December 1, 2018
48209 July 1, 2018 October 1, 2018 January 1, 2018
49210 August 1, 2018 November 1, 2018 February 1, 2018

MORE: http://www.detroitmi.gov/News/ArticleID/2061/Citywide-Effort-to-Bring-All-Rental-Properties-into-Compliance-Begins-Feb-1-in-ZIP-Code-48215

What does the Rental Registration Ordinance mean for Detroit renters?

  • The Rental Registration Ordinance potentially creates conflict between tenants and landlords while protecting neither.
  • The ordinance mandates renters continue to pay rent into an escrow account without providing clarity around the liability of living in non-compliant buildings.
  • All landlords need to be held accountable, but the Rental Registration Ordinance has the potential to target good landlords that have provided housing to low income Detroiters for decades.
  • Decrease in places for low-income Detroiters to live.
  • Disproportionately impacts small independent landlords and further diminishes black home and property ownership.

Major issues that threaten housing stability for Detroiters:

  • Limited affordable and desirable housing, escalating rent.
  • Utility shutoffs, including water
  • Lack of home maintenance and other support programs for small landlords.

 

More on the Rental Regulation Ordinance:

Rental companies sue over Detroit inspection ordinance

http://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/local/detroit-city/2018/01/15/rental-firms-sue-detroit-inspection-ordinance/109494578/

Crains is behind a subscription firewall, but if you have on here is their recent reporting on the ordinance.  http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article/20180122/news/650786/detroit-launches-broad-plan-to-bring-rental-properties-up-to-code#